Leadership & Management

Lessons from the first American pandemic: Racism

Date and Time:
Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 from 7:00-8:30pm EDT GMT-4

đź’» Zoom Virtual Event

Register for this event here: bit.ly/FacDevReg
(select "Lessons from the first American pandemic: Racism")

Coronavirus pandemic and the Black Lives Matter Movement have brought forward the need for a major look at health equity. It is important to develop a shared understanding of inequities in North American society to the forefront of our collective consciousness. Decades of research in racial health disparities have remained unaddressed and have shown little progress.

As we move vocabulary, and this lecture attempts to do so, we also seek to provide key examples of the magnitude and variety of ways racism has impacted the health of Black Americans. The initiatives and interventions used to correct for centuries of discrimination can also be replicated for other marginalized populations and countries.

Objectives

At the end of this virtual event, participants will be able to:

  • Define terms relevant to Health Equity

  • Contrast the difference between individual racism and structural racism

  • Review racial demographics relevant to US healthcare

  • Define implicit bias and its clinical correlation with regards to the Implicit Association Test

  • Engage colleagues in a discussion and anti-racist mind set for new solutions to health disparities

Speaker

Dr. Joshua Ellis is the current medical education fellow at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and the Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency where he is also expected to complete his master’s in public health at Harvard University. He completed his residency in Emergency Medicine at the Mayo Clinic, and was the recipient of the Gold Stethoscope educator of the year award and the Gold Humanism award. He was also awarded 40 under 40 Leaders in Health Award by the National Minority Quality Forum in 2020. His interests are in health equity and the advancement of diversity in medical education.

Dr. Anne Wong is Professor and Associate Chair of Education in the McMaster Department of Anesthesia and Director of the FHS Academic Leadership Program. She is a member of the McMaster EDI Advisory Committee and co-chair of the Training and Professional Development working group. Her academic interests include culture in medical education, global health education, faculty development, and gender and leadership.

Dr. Clare Wallner (@ClareWallner) is assistant professor in the Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine at McMaster University. She is a member of the McMaster EDI Advisory Advisory Committee and co-chair of the Training and Professional Development working group. Her academic interests include equity and inclusion in medical education and patient care.